dolcevittoria1938

dolcevittoria1938

Why Do FBI Agents Still Wear Those Curly Earphones?

Posted

You'd think that the U . s . secret service (being the United states FBI and all) would have access to an earpiece a bit cooler that just the conventional 'curly cable' job, wouldn't you?

If forced, I've to state that I tend to imagine some old fella, like Desmond Llewelyn in the Bond films, (and even a younger model like Ben Whishaw from 'Skyfall') making all the gadgets himself and then explaining them to the agents before they go out and protector the President's life.

This is just not the case. They use the models that they use because they work and they work well. Fundamentally, wired models continue to be more dependable than their wireless counterparts. With wireless, you tend to get more interference, as well as needing to contend with more limited bandwidth. Essentially, you'll need dependable tech when you're within the field. Lives are at stake in some cases.

This straightforward, trusted earpiece can be relied upon to accomplish the job, every time.

Another benefit that wired earpieces have over wireless ones (in this example, at least) may be the fact that a wired set needn't carry an additional battery. Wireless earpieces would need charging and, as a result, would have a somewhat limited operational capacity. It just causes a lot more headaches for people who, let's face it, previously possess a good bit on their plates to begin with.

Reported by 'AskJeeves.com'

"The ear piece and mic that the secret service uses is called a Throat Mic. The Throat Mic has clarity that is unsurpassed, great sound quality, and allows for discreet interaction. It also has an acoustic air tube that makes it comfortable when worn for long periods of time".

The 'curly earpiece' technology is generally rather popular and has been utilized by a number of people and organisations beyond the secret service. You can even purchase a wireless version, but don't expect the secret service to be interested!

I could contend another point, but this is just a pet theory with little or no research to back it up. Psychologically speaking, when you see a secret service agent, you identify them as such without observing them in any kind of uniform (beyond a suit, shades and an earpiece), the headset, then, is a subtle reminder to, the civilian, that not merely is this not a regular person in a suit, but also that the area in which you now find yourself is being strictly monitored.

With one remark to his/her earpiece, the agent in question can almost certainly call down all the other agents in the direct area, as well as police, fire brigade and anybody else he/she believes is necessary. That subtle reminder is likely an incredibly potent crime deterrent. No guns need to be displayed, no helmets or flak jackets worn and yet y'know that this individual has eyes all over the place and could, potentially, really ruin your week. As I said, it is just a hypothesis, but It looks like it makes sense.

Examples of Lateral Communication?

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The term 'lateral communication' can actually mean (at least) two different things.

In the natural world, lateral communication occurs whenever a group of animals appear to exhibit a collective intelligence. For example, when a flock of birds turns at the exact same time, remaining in perfect formation, this is lateral communication. Other examples include shoals of fish acting in perfect synch, or the movements of ant colonies.

In the business world, however, the term 'lateral communication' denotes something else entirely. In modern business, lateral communication is all to do with hierarchy. An example of lateral communication occurs when two workers on the same level discuss ideas (e.g. a manager talking to a manager). Its opposite term, 'diagonal communication', occurs when communication is initiated between different levels of hierarchy (e.g. talking to your boss' boss, or your boss talking to you).

From Wikipedia:

"The term lateral communication can be used interchangeably as horizontal communication. In his text entitled "Organizational Communication," Michael J. Papa defines horizontal communication as "the flow of messages across functional areas at a given level of an organization" (Papa and Daniels 55). With this system people at the same level are permitted "to communicate directly without going through several levels of organization" (Papa and Daniels 55). Given this elasticity, members within an organization have an easier time with "problem solving, information sharing across different work groups, and task coordination between departments or project teams" (Papa and Daniels 56). The use of lateral or horizontal communication in the workplace "can also enhance morale and afford a means for resolving conflicts (Koehler et al., 1981) (Papa and Daniels 56)."

The pawns, on the other hand, can only converse one space at a time and only in one direction. Oh wait; I'm getting confused again!

I hope that helps you, Sarah-Jane. I am unsure as to which definition you were looking for, so I focussed on both. If you have any follow-up questions, drop me a line the usual way and I'll try to get back to you as soon as I can.



you can find more info from this sitehere

The new Generation of Buses are hoping to make Milton Keynes green

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Eight experimental electric buses will be operating in Milton Keynes from late January onwards. The fleet will begin operating along the busy Number 7 route, which covers the 15 miles between Wolverton and Bletchley. They are the first electric buses to operate in the UK.

UK-based bus manufacturer Wrightbus have built these new electric buses in conjunction with Japanese company Mitsui and UK engineering group Arup.



Wireless 'booster' plates in the road, placed at the beginning/end of the route, give the buses a charge that allows them to operate for a full day. They are then charged overnight at the bus depot.

The buses will need to stop over the booster plates, before lowering the bus' own receiver plates and resting there for 10 minutes' charge time. The journey will then resume, exactly the same way a regular bus ride does.

The process is called 'inductive charging' and it involves electricity passing though wire coils in the plates that creates a magnetic field. The field then shares its voltage with the bus' receiver plates, charging them up.

Similar electric bus trials are being implemented in Italy, the Netherlands and Germany. In 2013, South Korea unveiled a 7.5-mile stretch of road, which recharges electric vehicles as they {you can find more drive over it, without requiring any charge time at all.

In an interview with the BBC, John Bint of Milton Keynes Council said, "Electric buses have huge potential and we're exploring how they can help us take better care of the environment without compromising passenger service,"

If these trial models prove to be successful, the Council plans to run them all across the town.



The environmental impact of this scheme is certainly considerable, with local councils potentially being able to significantly reduce their area's carbon footprint. In addition, the future development of electric buses can only help the similar evolution of the electric car, an invention that has the potential to seriously lower the world's carbon emissions.

Arup consultant John Miles who is also an engineering professor at Cambridge University, told BBC that, "These electric buses will be expected to do everything a diesel bus does (...) They will be operating on a demanding urban route, and that's all part of the trial's aim - to prove that electric buses can be tough as well as green."

the source of the piece is here

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dolcevittoria1938
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