dolcevittoria1938

dolcevittoria1938

Innovative or Simply Post-Modern? New Paradigms in the Study of "Radio"

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Radio is the wireless transmission of signals through free space by electromagnetic radiation of a frequency significantly below that of visible light, in the radio frequency range, from about 30 kHz to 300 GHz. These waves are called radio waves. Electromagnetic radiation travels by means of oscillating electromagnetic fields that pass through the air and the vacuum of space.

Information, such as sound, is carried by systematically changing some property of the radiated waves, such as their amplitude, frequency, phase, or pulse width. When radio waves strike an electrical conductor, the oscillating fields induce an alternating current in the conductor. The information in the waves can be extracted and transformed back into its original form.

Etymology

The etymology of "radio" or "radiotelegraphy" reveals that it was called "wireless telegraphy", which was shortened to "wireless" in Britain. The prefix radio- in the sense of wireless transmission, was first recorded in the word radioconductor, a description provided by the French physicist douard Branly in 1897. It is based on the verb to radiate .



The word "radio" also appears in a 1907 article by Lee De Forest. It was adopted by the United States Navy in 1912, to distinguish radio from several other wireless communication technologies, such as the photophone. The term became common by the time of the first commercial broadcasts in the United States in the 1920s. The term was adopted by other languages in Europe and Asia. British Commonwealth countries continued to commonly use the term "wireless" until the mid-20th century, though the magazine of the BBC in the UK has been called Radio Times ever since it was first published in the early 1920s.

In recent years the more general term "wireless" has gained renewed popularity through the rapid growth of short-range computer networking, e.g., Wireless Local Area Network, Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth, as well as mobile telephony, e.g., GSM and UMTS. Today, the term "radio" specifies the actual type of transceiver device or chip, whereas "wireless" refers to the lack of physical connections; one talks about radio transceivers, but another talks about wireless devices and wireless sensor networks.

Processes Radio systems used for communications will have the following elements. With more than 100 years of development, each process is implemented by a wide range of methods, specialized for different communications purposes.

Transmitter and modulation

Each system contains a transmitter. This consists of a source of electrical energy, producing alternating current of a desired frequency of oscillation. The transmitter contains a system to modulate some property of the energy produced to impress a signal on it. This modulation might be as simple as turning the energy on and off, or altering more subtle properties such as amplitude, frequency, phase, or combinations of these properties. The transmitter sends the modulated electrical energy to a tuned resonant antenna; this structure converts the rapidly changing alternating current into an electromagnetic wave that can move through free space.

Amplitude modulation of a carrier wave works by varying the strength of the transmitted signal in proportion to the information being sent. For example, changes in the signal strength can be used to reflect the sounds to be reproduced by a speaker, or to specify the light intensity of television pixels. It was the method used for the first audio radio transmissions, and remains in use today. "AM" is often used to refer to the medium wave broadcast band .

Frequency modulation varies the frequency of the carrier. The instantaneous frequency of the carrier is directly proportional to the instantaneous value of the input signal. Digital data can be sent by shifting the carrier's frequency among a set of discrete values, a technique known as frequency-shift keying.

FM is commonly used at VHF radio frequencies for high-fidelity broadcasts of music and speech. Normal TV sound is also broadcast using FM.

Angle modulation alters the instantaneous phase of the carrier wave to transmit a signal. It is another term for Phase modulation.

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Channel 4 Buys Hitler's Hair for 3 Thousand Pounds

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British TV station Channel 4 is being strongly criticized after it authorized the purchase of a lock of hair that apparently once belonged to Adolf Hitler, for 3000.



The hair, which was acquired for DNA testing as part of the upcoming show 'Dead Famous DNA', was allegedly collected by the Dictator's barber.

Channel 4 bought the hair from Nazi sympathizer and Holocaust denier David Irving. The controversial 'historian' also attempted to sell other Nazi memorabilia online in 2009.

Yahoo! News quoted Labour MP Ian Austin as saying that the sale represented a particularly uncouth publicity stunt. Austin said, "This sounds sick. It's appalling that Channel 4 would get involved with a Holocaust denier in some bizarre and tawdry show purporting to be entertainment (...) It's disgusting, and raises questions about Channel 4's public broadcasting remit."

However, Channel 4 defended the move, with a spokesperson saying that "We believe the potential importance of the scientific and historical insight justified the purchase,"

Initially considered to be a respected academic, British author David Irving's career as a historian gradually fell into decline as his works became more and more biased towards Hitler's Third Reich. He has since spoken at various Neo Nazi rallies and has gone on record, a great many times, as both a Holocaust denier and a virulent anti-Semite. He has stated that he believes in a Jewish conspiracy to rule the world and has openly accused concentration camp survivors of lying about their experiences.

At the time of writing, Irving is banned from entering Germany, Austria, Italy, Australia and Canada.

According to The Jewish Chronicle Online, Mark Gardner, director of communications at the Community Security Trust, said, "It is distasteful to see Hitler being sensationalized in this way, but even worse that David Irving - of all people - ought to profit from it in this way."

'Dead Famous DNA' is to be fronted by Mark Evans and will see the DNA testing of the remains of other famous figures from history. People like Charles Darwin, Marilyn Monroe and Napoleon Bonaparte. The programme will be broadcast later this week.

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Who Uses a Spy Earpiece?

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British comedian Jack Dee probably said it best, "Men like to use drills because secretly, we think they're guns". Tools just bring out our inner 007.

He's right. Men like gadgets for the same reason. We can't deny it, there's just something unassailably cool about a tool that you can use, but that no one else knows about.

Whether you're prancing around your house pointing a Black & Decker at imaginary henchmen, or fondly imagining that your fountain pen doubles as some sort of deadly offensive weapon, its OK to admit that you like the idea of gadgets.

If you're reading this and nodding, then you are almost certainly a man (or else, a bit of a Tomboy, which is fine too). In which case, you probably found this article whilst searching for a 'spy earpiece' online. Ergo, the sort of person who buys this is, well, someone just like you.

If, however, you clicked this page because you want to know what sort of person uses such a device (or indeed, what, if any, its practical applications are), then you've come to the right place, ma'am.

Its not all James Bond wannabes, you know.

Teaching professionals cunningly utilize spy earpieces to receive information in real time as they go through vast amounts of information in front of a class. They also employ such gadgets when giving lengthy and complex presentations to superiors or potential students. This goes double (or even triple) for public speakers.

Amazingly, the time spent preparing a reliable body of information and then having an accomplice drip feed the correct answers to you via the earpiece would probably be better spent actually learning the material in the first place. However, you can also use spy earpieces in presentations in much the same way that businesspeople do.

Security personnelwill also use spy earpieces, as surprising as that may be to read. Often, the security professional is used as a deterrent; large, imposing men and women are geared up with walkie-talkies and sharp suits or black uniforms in order to encourage would-be troublemakers to think twice. However, it is also common for security guards to operate in plain clothes, keeping an eye on potential situations discreetly and quietly. For this, they use a spy earpiece. For the same reasons, even undercover police have been known to employ spy earpieces.

So, the earpiece appeals to more than just the gadget-crazed would-be 007. Spy earpieces are used by a broad cross-section of the community, not just by men with a little too much time on their hands!

Finding a Spy earpiece can be a difficult task, the website EarpieceOnline.co.uk is one of the best places to get one.

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dolcevittoria1938
  • Location: Zavalla, TX
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