fancyphilosophe1912

fancyphilosophe1912

Can Bluetooth Earpieces Trigger Cancer?

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The old adage that 'mobile phone emissions can cause cancer' is a commonly held belief that doesn't actually have a huge amount of evidence behind it. Nevertheless, a lot of people genuinely believe that they can/will develop cancer after extensive use of a mobile phone.

Amazingly, this does little or nothing to deter these very same people from using their phones all the time!

To go to the root causes of this belief, we must first talk about the pioneering work of American ophthalmologist (that's an eye specialist) Dr. Milton Zaret. Milton was a giant in his field (and was even unintentionally name checked in a 2013 issue of 'Batman' - no joke). Among Dr. Zaret's most notable accomplishments was his research into the damaging effects that microwave emissions have on the Human eye.

There is a obvious, present and growing danger to the whole population of the UK from contact to the whole non-ionizing segment of the electromagnetic spectrum. The danger can't be overstated because most non-ionizing emission injuries happen clandestinely, usually do not become obvious until after many dormant years, and when they do, the effects are rarely documented.

It seems that there was a lot of political pressure on other researchers to discredit Dr. Zaret and his findings, which resulted in some fairly bad science, but equally in the general notion that Zaret was mistaken. However, his work was never conclusively proved, nor reliably debunked, leaving the case open to interpretation.

Although the emissions that bothered Dr. Zaret (anything from microwave ovens to radar technology) are not exactly the same as mobile phone emissions, the fundamental argument is similar. To date, nobody has been able to prove, or disprove, that mobile phones can cause cancer.

Since the development of mobile phone equipment, studies have been conducted to see if they cause health risks. The Bluetooth Headsets fear is rational, given that mobile phones are low-powered microwave emitters, and some microwaves have been revealed to cause health risks. Consumers and Experts agonize that keeping a microwave emitting gadget near your head and/or brain could put you in danger for brain cancer or other harm. The fear is now and again greater in regard to Bluetooth earpieces, as the gadget is located inside your ear and thus even nearer to your brain.

So, the old argument has now been transferred to Bluetooth Headsets (you are by no means the first person to ask this question). The key point being that the earpiece itself is actually much closer to your brain than a mobile phone. However, naysayers simply consider the level of microwave emission produced by the earpiece to be so low as to render the effects negligible.

Essentially, because the widespread use of mobile phones is a relatively recent phenomenon (although it must be said that the first mobile call was actually placed 41 years ago by Marty Cooper), it is simply too early to tell, one way or the other.

Because Bluetooth earpieces are such a new facet, it is not possible to get statistics about continuing effects of constant contact. Some propose that inside 20 years, advanced studies will be presented, as the first generation to grow up using mobile phones and earpieces will in fact be guinea pigs for lasting effects. If you are really worried about the microwave emission from your mobile phone, don't use Bluetooth earpieces and simply use the speaker-phone alternative that is standard on most Mobile phones. even though exact study has not provided comprehensible solutions as to whether Bluetooth earpieces can result in cancer, this may be an area where you feel it is better to be safe than sorry.

In conclusion, it does seem unlikely that your mobile phone can give you cancer. It seems logical enough to assume that we'd all be feeling the effects by now, after nearly two decades of mobile phone use (the second of which actually involved the majority of the population). However, nobody really knows for sure Dr. Zaret may yet be proven right as the prophet of doom (but, of course, we have to hope not).

WW1-Era Shipwrecks To Receive Protection

Posted

July 28th 1914 was a day that changed the world forever.

A global war was declared that would last for four long, bloody years and would cost Humanity millions of lives. Although the images of the gruelling, inhuman trench warfare that was waged in France are the perhaps most indelible from the conflict, it should also be remembered that an awful amount of lives were also lost at sea.

Britain alone lost over a thousand vessels from 1914 - 1919, together with about 89,300 sailors and merchant navy personnel. Germany lost hundreds of warships, as well as about 35,000 sailors. In addition, civilians were also caught in the ocean-going crossfire, as a German submarine sank the liner Lusitania in 1915, killing almost 2000 people in the process.

As we approach the centenary of the First World War, the seafloors are littered with the stark, skeletal remains of vessels leftover from this conflict. In recent years, however, these ruined ships have come under an increased level of threat from salvage teams, looters and profiteers, many of whom are intent on destroying the wrecks outright.

Shipwrecks such as those left over from the First World War, are a target for two main reasons. Firstly, they can be commercially exploited for scrap metals (and other artefacts) and secondly, fishing trawlers dredging the ocean depths in search of deep-sea fish can impact the ships, destroying them altogether.

In 2011 alone, three British cruisers, the final resting place of about 1,500 sailors altogether, were completely destroyed because copper and bronze had reached sufficiently high prices as to make such destructive salvage exercises profitable.

However, because the 100th anniversary of World War One begins this year, more and more of these ships will be protected by Unesco's 2001 'Convention on the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage', an agreement that extends International protection to shipwrecks over 100 years old.

Many people worry that these laws will prove difficult to enforce, however. Others still are worried that this move will increase the destruction of shipwrecks from more recent times, in particular, vessels from World War Two (1939 - 1945), before they come under Unesco's protection.

Today, historians are attempting to use the centenary of the First World War as a way to educate people about the history and legacy of the conflict, as well as to demonstrate the cultural and historical importance of these undersea war graves. Many, including this writer, feel that such sites are deserving of our respect and reverence.

Shipwrecks also provide a very good habitat for local marine life and can even form the basis for coral reefs (if left undisturbed for long enough). These vessels are also studied for scientific interest, with experiments carried out on everything from metal erosion to marine biology.

At the time of writing, the British Government has failed to sign the convention.



SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/scie nce-environment-28056244

New Electric Buses, improving arrival time

Posted

Eight experimental electric buses will be operating in Milton Keynes from late January onwards. The fleet will begin operating along the busy Number 7 route, which covers the 15 miles between Wolverton and Bletchley. They are the first electric buses to operate in the UK.

UK-based bus manufacturer Wrightbus have built these new electric buses in conjunction with Japanese company Mitsui and UK engineering group Arup.

Wireless 'booster' plates in the road, placed at the beginning/end of the route, give the buses a charge that allows them to operate for a full day. They are then charged overnight at the bus depot.

The buses will need to stop over the booster plates, before lowering the bus' own receiver plates and resting there for 10 minutes' charge time. The journey will then resume, exactly the same way a regular bus ride does.

The process is called 'inductive charging' and it involves electricity passing though wire coils in the plates that creates a magnetic field. The field then shares its voltage with the bus' receiver plates, charging them up.

Similar electric bus trials are being implemented in Italy, the Netherlands and Germany. In 2013, South Korea unveiled a 7.5-mile stretch of road, which recharges electric vehicles as they {you can find more drive over it, without requiring any charge time at all.

In an interview with the BBC, John Bint of Milton Keynes Council said, "Electric buses have huge potential and we're exploring how they can help us take better care of the environment without compromising passenger service,"

If these trial models prove to be successful, the Council plans to run them all across the town.

The environmental impact of this scheme is certainly considerable, with local councils potentially being able to significantly reduce their area's carbon footprint. In addition, the future development of electric buses can only help the similar evolution of the electric car, an invention that has the potential to seriously lower the world's carbon emissions.

Arup consultant John Miles who is also an engineering professor at Cambridge University, told BBC that, "These electric buses will be expected to do everything a diesel bus does (...) They will be operating on a demanding urban route, and that's all part of the trial's aim - to prove that electric buses can be tough as well as green."

the source of this piece is here

Star Trek Star 'Outed' by Guardian Blunder

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Guardian columnist Jane Czyzselska, writing for the newspaper's companion website, mistakenly 'outed' Shakespearean actor and 'Star Trek: The Next Generation' star Patrick Stewart as being gay.

In a column celebrating 'Inception' actress Ellen Page actually coming out as gay, Czyzselska wrote "some gay people, such asSir Patrick Stewart, think Page's coming out speech is newsworthy because a high-profile and surprisingly politically aware young actress has decided not to play by the rules that so many closeted Hollywood actors are advised to follow if they are to enjoy mainstream success,"

It just so happens that the 73-year-old Shakespearean actor, best known for his roles as Professor Charles Xavier in the 'X-Men' movies and as Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the TV series 'Star Trek: The Next Generation' and its companion films - isn't gay.

In fact, Stewart has been married - to Women - three times, most recently in September of last year, when he married American jazz singer Sunny Ozell. He also has two children from a previous marriage.

The Guardian rushed to correct its mistake, adding an addendum at the bottom of the page, but Stewart didn't seem to mind a bit.

"It makes a nice change" tweeted Stewart in response to the 'outing'. "At least I didn't wake up to the Internet telling me I was dead again". At the time of writing, that post has been 'retweeted' 1,181 times.



For those who don't know, Sir Patrick Stewart is a huge supporter of LGBT rights. He vocally supports gay marriage and was even given the 2013 'Straight Ally of The Year Award' from PFLAG.

Fellow 'Star Trek' star William Shatner joined in the fun, Tweeting, "I never get that kind of coverage! I'm jealous!"

The confusion may have arisen because Sir Patrick's best friend is openly gay actor Sir Ian McKellen. If that was the case, Stewart tweeted this response: "I have, like, five or even SEVEN hetero friends and we totally drink beer and eat lots of chicken wings!" Is it just me, or is it impossible to read the above quote without hearing Captain Picard's voice in your head?

On a more serious note, Stewart has often spoken about civil rights, he once said, "From my earliest years as an actor I have always been proud of the support the creative community gives to all forms of human and civil rights,"



In fact, Patrick Stewart is no stranger to fighting the good fight, the actor has been a vocal opponent of domestic violence (working with Amnesty International) and he is also a patron for Refuge, a UK-based charity for abused Women.

... And no, he isn't dead.

the source of the post is here

Essential Services, essential Technology, Radios with Oil & Gasoline Plants

Posted

Oil and gas are natural resources, but obtaining them isn't as simple as planting a seed in a patch of arable land. Today, hundreds of thousands of miles of oil and gas pipeline run all over the world, sometimes covering some of the most inhospitable environments known to man.

Pipelines that run above ground offer many advantages to oil & gas companies. They are cheaper to build, easier to repair, far simpler to maintain and a lot safer for the environment. However, that same environment also has no qualms about wreaking havoc on the lines, neither do politically motivated saboteurs or occasional wanton vandals who commonly make their presence felt in such places. A pipeline is a complex and intricate operation, which means that in order for everything to go right, nothing can be allowed to go wrong.

Keeping such sites clean, safe and secure is a demanding job. If you built one in an urban city centre it would be hard enough, but placing a pipeline in an extreme environment is a job so tough that only a very few select people are cut out for it.

For a job like that, communication is key. It is vital that all aspects of the pipeline are monitored, kept safe and guarded by highly trained professionals. So, in order for all functional teams to stay in contact, react, if need be, to technical faults and generally keep pipeline operations running smoothly, two-way radios are needed.

More reliable than a mobile, less clumsy than a net connection, two-way radio technology is tried, tested and true. Durable, strong outward exteriors are perfect for unforgiving environments such as heavy snow or storms at sea, while a simple, easy to use device is always best in cases of emergency.

Then, there's reliability. Two-way radios are pretty much always reliable. There's no worrying about signal strength (unless atmospheric conditions are particularly severe) and no ambiguity as to whether of not the user has been heard and understood by the intended recipient. Signal transfer is instantaneous (or, in the case of digital radios, as good as), so you can get direct up-to-the-second information, at any time.

Two-way radios are a massively important factor in the steady, safe and efficient refining of natural oils and gases into vital, everyday products and services. Without two-way radios, obtaining such treasures might prove next to impossible, as well as incredibly dangerous.

the source of this post ishere

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fancyphilosophe1912
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